come together

To is a preposition, come is a verb.
To is a preposition, come is a verb.
To is a preposition, come is a verb, the verb intransitive.
To come. To come.
I’ve heard these two words my whole adult life, and as a child when I thought I was sleeping. To come. To come.
It’s been like a big drum solo:
Didya come? Didya come good? Didya come good didya come good didya come good?
Recitatif: I come better with you sweetheart than with anyone in the whole goddamn world.
I really came so good. I really came so good ‘cause I love you.
Really came so good. I come better with you sweetheart, than anyone in the whole world, I really came so good. So good.
BUT.
Don’t come in me.
Don’t come in me.
Don’t come imme, mimme mimme
don’t come imme mimme mimme
don’t come in me.
I CAN’T COME.
Cause you don’t love me, that’s why you can’t come.
I love you I just can’t come, that’s my hangup. I can’t come when I’m loaded, all right?
Cause you don’t love me.
Just what the hell is the matter with you? What has that got to do with loving you? I just can’t come, that’s all.
Now if anyone in this room or the world finds those two words decadent, obscene, immoral, amoral, asexual, the words “to come” really make you feel uncomfortable, if you think I’m rank for saying it to you, and you the beholder gets rank for listening to it…
You probably can’t come.
-Lenny Bruce

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